Diversity – redux

One of the recurring arguments against affirmative action from majority-represented groups is that it’s unfair that the under-represented group has comparatively special treatment.

Fair warning: this is not really a blog post about IT security, but about issues which pertain to our industry.  You’ll find social sciences and humanities – “soft sciences” – referenced.  I make no excuses (and I should declare previous form*).

Warning two: many of the examples I’m going to be citing are to do with gender discrimination and imbalances.  These are areas that I know the most about, but I’m very aware of other areas of privilege and discrimination, and I’d specifically call out LGBTQ, ethnic minority, age, disability and non-neurotypical discrimination.  I’m very happy to hear (privately or in comments) from people with expertise in other areas.

You’ve probably read the leaked internal document (a “manifesto”) from a Google staffer talking challenging affirmative action to try to address diversity, and complaining about a liberal/left-leaning monoculture at the company.  If you haven’t, you should: take the time now.  It’s well-written, with some interesting points, but I have some major problems with it that I think it’s worth addressing.  (There’s a very good rebuttal of certain aspects available from an ex-Google staffer.)  If you’re interested in where I’m coming from on this issue, please feel free to read my earlier post: Diversity in IT security: not just a canine issue**.

There are two issues that concern me specifically:

  1. no obvious attempt to acknowledge the existence of privilege and power imbalances;
  2. the attempt to advance the gender essentialism argument by alleging an overly leftist bias in the social sciences.

I’m not sure that these approaches are intentional or unconscious, but they’re both insidious, and if ignored, allow more weight to be given to the broader arguments put forward than I believe they merit.  I’m not planning to address those broader issues: there are other people doing a good job of that (see the rebuttal I referenced above, for instance).

Before I go any further, I’d like to record that I know very little about Google, its employment practices or its corporate culture: pretty much everything I know has been gleaned from what I’ve read online***.  I’m not, therefore, going to try to condone or condemn any particular practices.  It may well be that some of the criticisms levelled in the article/letter are entirely fair: I just don’t know.  What I’m interested in doing here is addressing those areas which seem to me not to be entirely open or fair.

Privilege and power imbalances

One of the recurring arguments against affirmative action from majority-represented groups is that it’s unfair that the under-represented group has comparatively special treatment.  “Why is there no march for heterosexual pride?”  “Why are there no men-only colleges in the UK?”  The generally accepted argument is that until there is equality in the particular sphere in which a group is campaigning, then the power imbalance and privilege afforded to the majority-represented group means that there may be a need for action to help for members the under-represented group to achieve parity.  That doesn’t mean that members of that group are necessarily unable to reach positions of power and influence within that sphere, just that, on average, the effort required will be greater than that for those in the majority-privileged group.

What does all of the above mean for women in tech, for example?  That it’s generally harder for women to succeed than it is for men.  Not always.  But on average.  So if we want to make it easier for women (in this example) to succeed in tech, we need to find ways to help.

The author of the Google piece doesn’t really address this issue.  He (and I’m just assuming it’s a man who wrote it) suggests that women (who seem to be the key demographic with whom he’s concerned) don’t need to be better represented in all parts of Google, and therefore affirmative action is inappropriate.  I’d say that even if the first part of that thesis is true (and I’m not sure it is: see below), then affirmative action may still be required for those who do.

The impact of “leftist bias”

Many of the arguments presented in the manifesto are predicated on the following thesis:

  • the corporate culture at Google**** are generally leftist-leaning
  • many social sciences are heavily populated by leftist-leaning theorists
  • these social scientists don’t accept the theory of gender essentialism (that women and men are suited to different roles)
  • THEREFORE corporate culture is overly inclined to reject gender essentialism
  • HENCE if a truly diverse culture is to be encouraged within corporate culture, leftist theories such as gender essentialism should be rejected.

There are several flaws here, one of which is that diversity means accepting views which are anti-diverse.  It’s a reflection of a similar right-leaning fallacy that in order to show true tolerance, the views of intolerant people should be afforded the same privilege of those who are aiming for greater tolerance.*****

Another flaw is the argument that just because a set of theories is espoused by a political movement to which one doesn’t subscribe that it’s therefore suspect.

Conclusion

As I’ve noted above, I’m far from happy with much of the so-called manifesto from what I’m assuming is a male Google staffer.  This post hasn’t been an attempt to address all of the arguments, but to attack a couple of the underlying arguments, without which I believe the general thread of the document is extremely weak.  As always, I welcome responses either in comments or privately.

 


*my degree is in English Literature and Theology.  Yeah, I know.

**it’s the only post on which I’ve had some pretty negative comments, which appeared on the reddit board from which I linked it.

***and is probably therefore just as far off the mark as anything else that you or I read online.

****and many other tech firms, I’d suggest.

*****an appeal is sometimes made to the left’s perceived poster child of postmodernism: “but you say that all views are equally valid”.  That’s not what postmodern (deconstructionist, post-structuralist) theory actually says.  I’d characterise it more as:

  • all views are worthy of consideration;
  • BUT we should treat with suspicion those views held by those which privilege, or which privilege those with power.

Talking to (actual) people – a guide for security folks

…”am I safe from this ransomware thing?”

As you may have noticed*, there was somewhat of a commotion over the past week when the WannaCrypt ransomware infection spread across the world, infecting all manner of systems**, most notably, from my point of view, many NHS systems.  This is relevant to me because I’m UK-based, and also because I volunteer for the local ambulance service as a CFR.  And because I’m a security professional.

I’m not going to go into the whys and wherefores of the attack, of the importance of keeping systems up to date, the morality of those who spread ransomware***,  how to fund IT security, or the politics of patch release.  All of these issues have been dealt with very well elsewhere. Instead, I’m going to discuss talking to people.

I’m slightly hopeful that this most recent attack is going to have some positive side effects.  Now, in computing, we’re generally against side effects, as they usually have negative unintended consequences, but on Monday, I got a call from my Dad.  I’m aware that this is the second post in a row to mention my family, but it turns out that my Dad trusts me to help him with his computing needs.  This is somewhat laughable, since he uses a Mac, which employs an OS of which I have almost no knowledge****, but I was pleased that he even called to ask a question about it.  The question was “am I safe from this ransomware thing?”  The answer, as he’d already pretty much worked out was, “yes”, and he was also able to explain that he was unsurprised, because he knew that Macs weren’t affected, and because he keeps it up to date, and because he keeps backups.

Somebody, somewhere (and it wasn’t me on this occasion) had done something right: they had explained, in terms that my father could understand, not only the impact of an attack, but also what to do to keep yourself safe (patching), what systems were most likely to be affected (not my Dad’s Mac), and what do to in mitigation (store backups).  The message had come through the media, but the media, for a change, seemed to have got it correct.

I’ve talked before about the importance of informing our users, and allowing them to make choices.  I think we need to be honest, as well, about when things aren’t going well, when we (singularly, or communally) have made a mistake.  We need to help them to take steps to protect themselves, and when that fails, to help them clear things up.

And who was it that made the mistake?  The NSA, for researching vulnerabilities, or for letting them leak?  Whoever it was leaked them?  Microsoft, for not providing patches?  The sysadmins, for not patching?  The suits, for not providing money for upgrades?  The security group, putting sufficient controls in place to catch and contain the problem?  The training organisation for not training the users enough?  The users, for ignoring training and performing actions which allowed the attack to happen?

Probably all of the above.  But, in most of those cases, talking about the problem, explaining what to do, and admitting when we make a mistake, is going to help improve things, not bring the whole world crashing down around us.  Talking, in other words, to “real” people (not just ourselves and each other*****): getting out there and having discussions.

Sometimes a lubricant can help: tea, beer, biscuits******.  Sometimes you’ll even find that “real” people are quite friendly.  Talk to them.  In words they understand.  But remember that even the best of them will nod off after 45 minutes or so of our explaining our passion to them.  They’re only human, after all.

 


*unless you live under a rock.

**well, Windows systems, anyway.

***(scum).

****this is entirely intentional: the less I know about their computing usage, the easier it is for me to avoid providing lengthy and painful (not to mention unpaid) support services to my close family.

*****and our machines.  Let’s not pretend we don’t do that.

******probably not coffee: as a community, we almost certainly drink enough of that as it is.